Kelvedon Hatch Nuclear Bunker

The Ghosts of Kelvedon Hatch Nuclear Bunker

 

There have been many reports of paranormal activity throughout the bunker. Apparently, there has only been one death at the bunker. During construction, it is believed one on the workers fell into wet concrete and died. His hat was found on the surface of the concrete by workers and the man was never seen again. I have been unable to find any facts behind this claim. 

A grey figure described as a tall, elderly lady has been seen on many occasions.

An RAF male soldier, as well as a woman in uniform who tells those who see her to leave immediately, have also been seen. 

A malevolent spirit is said to reside in the sick bay and surrounding areas. This spirit impresses feelings of dread and foreboding on visitors, and is believed to originate from long before the bunker existed. 

There are reports of stones being thrown from unseen hands, strange mists and lights have been seen and foul odours smelt.  

Disembodied voices and even a growling sound have been heard. 

The History of Kelvedon Hatch Nuclear Bunker

 

Kelvedon Hatch Nuclear Bunker looks like nothing more than an ordinary bungalow, nestled amongst the trees in the Essex countryside. However, looks can be deceiving. Inside lies a 3 floor hardened bunker built 125ft (38m) underground. It was built between 1952-1953 by Peter Lind and Company of London.

It was originally built as an air defence station as part of RAF ROTOR project. This was a program designed to improve Britain's air defence network. When ROTOR SOC (Self Operations Control) wound down use of the building, it became the Government Home Office RSG (Regional Seat of Government). The remaining Nuclear Reporting Cell and UKWMO elements were incorporated in their use. From the 1960s to the early 1990s, the Home Office used the bunker as an emergency regional government defence site. The bunker could house more than five hundred people, and in the event of a nuclear strike, it would have been used to organise the survival of the British population and continue government operations. The bunker boasted heating and air conditioning, as well as generators and water supplies. It was also equipped with many means of communication including radios and various military systems.

As the Cold War came to an end and the bunker was no longer needed, it was decommissioned in 1992, and the land was sold back to the original owners. It now operates as a Cold War museum.